Now We No!

Now We No!

 

Last month I started a discussion on ‘Health.’ It is called #HealthyistheNewS.E.X.Y. Just hover over the hashtag and read February’s blog for details. I want ‘Health’ to be viewed first before we look at the manifestations of what occurs if we’re not as healthy as we’d like to be. ‘Health’ deserves to have center stage and be sexy-as-she-wanna-be. I well-comed ‘Health’ with open arms, but I wasn’t ready for how it chose to come to me. What I will say is if ‘Health’ is your aim allow it to come as its origin – a person, place, or thing.

I was sent a video to watch and asked what my thoughts were about it. At first I wondered why am I watching this? ‘Health’ presented herself to me in a way that I’ve long since crossed over. I looked at the video again. I told ‘Health’ I’m no longer in that phase of my life. I even attended a live demonstration where another male presenter held the same product that I viewed before, doesn’t directly affect him, but it does affect any female in his life. And again, although amazed even more by this product, I still wondered why me? I noticed I kept squashing an inner voice telling me to pay attention. I answered, “I’ve passed this rite of passage.” It wasn’t until after a teleconference, attending an informational session of this product, another teleconference, and getting a good night’s sleep that I had no choice but to pay attention to the inner voice.

At the age of ten I started my menstrual cycle. It was presented to me in a way that I didn’t care about it. I saw it as an imposition. I was told about it by a mother who didn’t know how to explain it me, and a grandmother whose face looked like death warmed over. Her response was, “I was becoming a woman, it would come monthly, and I could get pregnant.” I had to wear a small version of a guillotine. Back in the day we had to wear an elastic thong that was held together by two metal clamps. This is what an elephant sized sanitary pad was attached to and a belt worn around my waist to hold it in place – not. Uncomfortable to say the least.

I didn’t have cramps as most of my girlfriends had during that time of the month. I went to school, bled profusely using three to four oversize pads a day. Mine was normal compared to other females who had to go home, lay down, and take Motrin by the bottles. I didn’t hate this moment I just didn’t connect with it. I looked at it as a function of the body, no more, no less. Even after I turned thirty when cramps, bloating, and emotions made up for lost time for not visiting me in my teens. They came in with a vengeance from my thirty’s until it ended quietly as it came in, in my late forty’s. I still did not connect with the “flow.”

Fast forward. ‘Health’ wanted me to reconnect to a moment that I barely gave notice to other than I bought pads, used pads, threw pads away, and started the process all over again for the duration of five days. I rejected an integral part of my femininity. A female being on her “flow” is to be celebrated, honored, and protected. From the first conversation, a little girl has with her mother to the end of her flow those three factors should be intimately involved in her life.

The presentation I viewed is called, “Cherish,” a sanitary napkin. But the movement I’m a part of is called “No We No”. No, that’s not a grammatical error. The reputation of this sanitary napkin is fused with protecting a woman’s female part, her honor, while celebrating her ‘flow’. This napkin even from its name, is changing the story for mothers to tell their daughters when they begin their ‘flow’. They feel confident in giving their daughters a product that will protect their femininity from fear. Fear of smell, and uninvited spots on the back of clothes and as you watch the video on the right side of the screen, fear from that too (fill in the blank… lol!)

As you watch the video allow ‘Health,’ to speak to you about your ‘flow.’ You may be surprised at what you hear. #NowWeNo #HealthyistheNewSexy

 

How Do You ‘Scend?

How Do You ‘Scend?

enjoyingrock

 

 

howtorockI’ve learned a new term in rock climbing called ‘scend. It is “when a climber must not just work with the rock, but must also become absorbed by it.” Reading one of my favorite magazine’s Spirituality & Health the term is coined in an article entitled, “Understanding the Rush to Connect.” The author speaks of how people who are thrill seekers are often misunderstood and unfairly labeled by those who don’t imbibe in extreme sports. They are often spoken of as the aggressive jock who must conquer at all cost. When actually the writer states that most participants are people who “feel empowered, more by humbling emotions than by dominant ones. Instead of feeling larger than life, they feel small and vulnerable… As these athletes work in unity with the natural environment, humanity’s dependence on and responsibility to the earth becomes markedly clear.

I, for one, love extreme sports. But alas, I’m a spectator, not a participant. It’s not that I don’t want to but certain physical challenges limit my ability to do so. Yet, even as a spectator, I feel the rush with the participant. I allow my body to feel the exhilaration, the near misses, and the misplaced step that invites a loss.

wheretorockThis term, though peaked my interest to see if I ‘scend in my own way. Do I become one and connect with activities that I do partake in. Off the bat, I knew writing was a ‘scend for me. When I’m into a story my imagination soars. Creating worlds, people, places and things are my crack addiction. I see these creatures in my mind. I try to be descriptive as I can breathing life into their character. Watching anime, or children’s movies are the simplest wisdom and answers to questions I’ve posed to the Universe. The other night I saw the Disney/Pixar movie Inside/Out. I laughed because at that moment I was battling with how I’ve been seen through the lens of other people. Labels such as “you are too emotional,” or, “your emotions are unstable.” I will agree at times they are but watching this movie allowed me to see how certain emotions, i.e., sadness, is needed in order to unearth the root of what you’re feeling. Any emotion can be “too emotional.” As in the movie the emotion Joy had to learn balance and when it was her turn to just follow. Every emotion has its place, time, and exact moment to realize what is needed for a person to fully connect with self. I have more area’s but for the use of time and you are not pressing the browser button to go to another article I’ll stop here. But I’ve learned three points from ‘scend.

  •   It’s not a one time ascension to conquer a problem.
  •   You may not make it to the top, but each time you attempt to climb again you will have small victories.
  •   Each problem has several peaks within itself that will need to be addressed strategically, methodically, and sometimes painfully slow.

scaredrockThis means there are lessons to be learned that possibly will take longer to reach the goal. It doesn’t mean that you’ve failed. It means that what you’re scaling is monumental and must be defeated brick by brick. No, it’s not fun or easy, but break it down into bite sizes so you can celebrate the small victories along the way. And yes, celebrate! This is forgotten along the way. I know I have because I concentrated on the pain of the climb and was too tired or angry to see how far I had come. I’ll be transparent. I haven’t celebrated my journey as much I should have because it was too daunting. And yes, sometimes it didn’t turn out the way I wanted it to be. I concentrated on my way versus the Universe’s way of defining the victory. I know, the entities Pride and Control yeah, I tussle with them too… lol! But at least I can admit it. Victory!

Okay, I’ve run over my word limit, but I thought this word important to share with you. Think about how you connect with your activities and people. How do you ‘scend?

Namaste’